Super Easy DIY Coconut Milk & Coconut Flour

DIY Coconut Milk | All Sorts of Pretty

So many of you enjoyed learning how to make the Almond Milk and Almond Flour that I posted a couple weeks ago, that I thought I would come back to show you how to make Coconut Milk and Coconut Flour (spoiler alert: It’s just as easy and is done the exact same way!).

First question I get asked a lot: Why make your own when you can buy it at the store?  My answer is that yes, of course you can buy it at the store, and it’s a great option for those that can’t or don’t want to drink cow’s milk and especially if you don’t have time to make your own alternative.  But if you can make your own, you lose all the additives that you may not want to consume.  Here is a list of all the ingredients listed in the coconut milk I had been buying for long time.  There’s stuff in there I don’t know anything about and there’s a lot of added sugar.  Of course, you can add sweeteners like honey or dates or stevia and flavors like vanilla to your own, but YOU get to control how much and again, you still don’t have the additives of commercially produced coconut milk that make it shelf stable for weeks or months.

Second most popular question: Does it save money?  I believe the answer is similar to the almond milk.  It’s not necessarily cheaper, though it costs about the same but if you also make the coconut flour, then yes it saves a ton.  Coconut flour is spensy!  Like $14/lb at my grocery store.  It’s a great gluten-free, wheat-free alternative to flour in baking though it is expensive   If you make your own coconut milk, it’s so easy to go one step further and convert the pulp to flour that would have been tossed anyway.

So that’s why I like to make my own!  But I also have (make?) the time to do it because it’s important to me and I don’t drink so much of it that I am constantly running out.  Here’s how I do it!

DIY Coconut Milk | All Sorts of Pretty

I just went out the regular grocery store and bought a package of unsweetened (organic if you can) shredded coconut – this is the kind I bought.  You can also use coconut flakes that aren’t as fine a texture – both work.  An 8oz package yields 2 cups of shredded coconut, perfect for this recipe.

There are two different ways to incorporate the water before blending in a blender:

  1. You can soak the coconut for about 2 hours to let it soften up, or
  2. You can boil the water and immediately blend it up to make your milk.

The first option is best if you’re on a raw food diet, but takes more preparation.  The second option is quick, but you have to be careful when squeezing the moisture out as it may burn your hands.  I’ll talk about how to keep your hands safe in a second.

DIY Coconut Milk | All Sorts of Pretty

It’s really as easy as putting the coconut and water in a blender and blending on high for 3-5 minutes until you get a creamy consistency like above.  Don’t worry about it being perfectly smooth, we just want it well blended.

DIY Coconut Milk | All Sorts of Pretty

I highly recommend buying a nut milk bag for this or the almond milk.  Cheese cloth will work, but it doesn’t strain as well (you’ll have sediment at the bottom of your milk) and it doesn’t hold up as well.  It’s also a lot harder to get clean and remove all traces of the nut.  I bought mine here (bonus: this company sends you a handwritten thank you note for ordering.  How nice is that?) and for $8, I think it’s a steal considering how often it gets used.

DIY Coconut Milk | All Sorts of Pretty

DIY Coconut Milk

Ingredients and Equipment

  • 2 cups unsweetened shredded coconut or coconut flakes
  • 4 cups water
  • blender
  • nut milk bag, cheese cloth or clean dish towel

Directions

  • Option 1 (soaking method):
  • Soak coconut in water for 2 hours, then blend on high to smooth consistency (about 3-5 minutes).
  • Once coconut and water is blended, pour in to nut milk bag or over cheese cloth (I’ve heard a clean dish towel will work too, haven’t tried it though).
  • Squeeeeeeeeze! Get as much moisture out as possible so you get more milk and so the pulp doesn’t take as long to dry out to make flour.
  • Option 2: (boiled water method)
  • Bring 4 cups water to a boil, then pour in to blender with coconut, blending on high to smooth consistency (about 3-5 minutes).
  • Once coconut and water is blended, allow to cool for a few minutes.
  • Pour mixture through nut milk bag or cheese cloth mixture (see above note).
  • Squeeeeeeeeze!  If it’s still too hot, place the bag in a bowl and pop in the freezer for a few minutes.  Once it’s cooled enough, come back and squeeze as much moisture out as possible.

*Also worth noting, just like with the almond milk, this makes great coffee creamer if you add less water to make it thick and creamy.  Flavors can also be added (pumpkin spice in the fall anyone?!).

THIS IS THE PART WHERE YOU DO NOT THROW AWAY THE LEFTOVER PULP!  Save it, because now you can make coconut flour with it:

DIY Coconut Flour | All Sorts of Pretty

DIY Coconut Milk | All Sorts of Pretty9

DIY Coconut Milk | All Sorts of Pretty10DIY Coconut Flour

Ingredients and Equipment

  • The pulp left over from making the coconut milk above.
  • baking sheet (do not use cooking spray – parchment paper is fine)
  • food processor

Directions

  • Preheat oven to 170 degrees.
  • Pour out coconut pulp mixture on to baking sheet and break up any big chunks with a fork.  Spread as thin and even a layer as possible.
  • Place in oven and bake for about 45 mins.  You’ll be able to tell if it’s ready by touching it.  Do you feel any moisture?  Keep it in the oven for a few more minutes until it’s completely dry.
  • Place in food processor and blend on high for 1-2 minutes until finely ground.

PS: Make your own almond milk and almond flour too if you haven’t already.

xoxo

126 Responses to “Super Easy DIY Coconut Milk & Coconut Flour”

  1. Stephanie

    How long can the flour be kept? Also, do you use it in ANY recipe as you would regular flour?

    Reply
    • Katy

      Hey Stephanie! This is a great resource for your questions: http://www.gygi.com/blog/2012/08/09/gluten-free-baking-coconut-flour/

      Make sure your coconut flour is stored in an airtight container; if it’s kept in a cool, dark place or the refrigerator, it will last about a year. If it’s stored somewhere exposed to lots of sunlight, about 6 months. See the link for conversion info and tips for baking with coconut flour.

      Reply
  2. Llbehr

    Clean pantyhose work great, too. Strange, but it works. I waited until it was cool to strain it.

    Reply
    • Katy

      Oh, smart! I bet that would work even better than cheesecloth. Great tip!

      Reply
  3. jamie

    I love this! Thanks for posting! My coconut flour is currently drying and my oven smells soooo yummy! But I noticed that in my jar of coconut milk there is a thick build up of coconut lumpies at the top that has separated…I tried to shake it up and it helped a little, but I still am getting a little chunky pulp when I take a drink. Did I just muscle too much outta there when squeezing the pulp?? I used a cheesecloth that was actually quadrupled. Perhaps I will try the pantyhose technique next time!

    Reply
  4. Ericka

    Made this today and it was delicious! My coconut flour is still pretty grainy – how do you get it flour like in a food processor?

    Reply
    • Katy

      So glad, Ericka! The coconut four won’t get as fine as dust like you buy it in the store, unfortunately. Blenders like ours are just not as good as industrial grinders. But I find it to be pretty close and works just fine in baking.

      Reply
    • Emily

      I have the same problem when making powdered sugar. I find a coffee grinder or powerful blender way better. I would assume the same thing for this.

      Reply
  5. Aly

    Thank you for your informative blog, Katy. My friend has been teaching me a lot of DIY tricks to eat naturally. We didn’t have coconut flour yesterday and just pulsed some unsweetened coconut finely instead to use in fudgy coconut flour brownies. The recipe didn’t turn out. Is the soaking and coconut milk step important to the end result in making the flour? The flour seemed to separate in the oven. The edges of the brownies near the side of the glass dish rose about two inches higher than the rest of the mixture. Thank you, Aly.

    Reply
    • Katy

      Hey Aly! Sorry your coconut flour didn’t work out…I suspect it’s because there was too much moisture in the coconut you tried to use and that’s why it separated, rather than binding together with the rest of the ingredients. If you didn’t want to make the coconut milk first to get the flour, I would suggest drying it out in the oven or a dehydrator for a few hours first. I haven’t tried this so I don’t know for sure, but if I had to guess, I would say that would work for you next time. Good luck and thanks for the comment! :)

      Reply
  6. Marie Knight

    Hi! I love this recipe for Coconut flour/milk. I am wondering where you got your super awesome bottle in the photo showing the coconut milk? Thx!

    Reply
    • Katy

      Hey Marie! Thanks for the sweet comment! I got that bottle at Hobby Lobby – they have tons of vintage-looking but inexpensive and practical bottles. Hope you find one you like! :)

      Reply
  7. Anna

    Thank you so much, this is brilliant. Next I’m trying the almond milk and flour. I have to thank you for a brilliant blog, you are so right in what you are doing, we should embrace life and see all the beauty that surrounds us. You are definitely on the right track and very inspiring. I wish you all the best and will continue to follow your blog.

    Reply
  8. Lanier

    Back where I came from, we use a fresh coconut. You can get it cheaper at any Asian store or HIspanic store. Break the coconut open and you can drink the water. Asian people have some kind of special manual grinder to shred coconut. Usually, I use 1 cup of water to extract the purest coconut milk. You can squeeze up to 3 times more .

    Reply
    • Katy

      Oh wow, that sounds awesome! And intimidating! I would love to know how to break open a coconut and extract the water and meat from it like a pro. I’ll have to look in to it – thanks for sharing, Lanier! :)

      Reply
      • Cristina Schuchart

        You have to make a hole on one of the spots on the top of the coconut to remove the water before you break it open. Usually only one of the spots will allow you to make the hole(I don’t know why). After you get the hole you put the coconut with the hole down on a cup to remove the water from it, then you can just throw the fruit on a hard and clean surface, like a cement area. I throw mine beside my pool, where its usually clean, being careful to not let the fruit fall inside of the pool, off course LOL. I come from Brasil and we eat a lot of coconut there. Hope that helps.

        Reply
        • Katy

          Oh my goodness! It’s so much work to break open a coconut! Thanks for the instructions, Cristina! :)

          Reply
    • Charlotte

      I have a grater that is attached to a little stool, it is just a half moon shaped piece of metal with ‘teeth’…it’s awesome!
      Do you have any other ideas for what to use the leftover coconut pulp for? (I always use fresh coconuts)

      Reply
      • Katy

        Hey Charlotte! Leftover coconut pulp can be used in many baking recipes…just google “coconut flour recipe” and you should be able to find TONS.

        Reply
  9. Jill

    Just wanted to you to know that your post came to my rescue this morning. I couldn’t find coconut flour at the store so I decided to make my own. It turned out great! Thank you!

    Reply
  10. Christa

    Hi Katy, thanks for this info. Do you think grinding the coconut in a coffee grinder might get it to a finer consistency?

    Reply
    • Katy

      Hey Christina! Yes, a coffee grinder would probably yield a finer consistency, but you may have to work in multiple batches. Never tried it though, but good luck! Let me know how it goes :)

      Reply
  11. Christa

    Oh and was also curious how long the coconut milk lasts in the fridge and have you ever tried freezing it? Thanks :)

    Reply
    • Katy

      Lasts about a week, 5-7 days, and yes, I have frozen it and it was fine after thawing in the fridge for a few days.

      Reply
    • Katy

      Oh yay, I’m so happy to hear that! Thanks so much for the sweet comment, you just made my day :)

      Reply
  12. tuesdayrain

    Love all of your blogs. I have been searching for a recipe for coonut flour.
    I am searching for a coconut icecream recipe that utilizes coconut milk, and coconut oil. Any suggestions?

    Reply
  13. Carolyn

    tuesday rain, I don’t use coconut oil in my ice cream but here is a recipe for coconut ice cream. I would probably give coconut sugar a go instead of the icing sugar, because I’m into all things coconut these days. I posted this recipe to my blog some time ago…

    COCONUT ICE CREAM
    (#1 rule of ice cream making…get all your ingredients as cold as possible…so put the coconut milk in the fridge, too!)

    2/3 cup water
    1/2 cup icing (confectioner’s) sugar
    2 limes
    1 (14 oz) can coconut milk

    Put the 2/3 cup water in a small saucepan. Tip in the sugar and bring to the boil, stirring constantly until the sugar has all dissolved. Remove from the heat and cool, then chill well.

    Zest the limes and finely dice the rind. Squeeze the limes and pour the juice and rind into the pan of syrup. Add the coconut milk and blend together all ingredients.

    Churn in ice cream maker until firm enough to scoop.

    This is good enough to make you want to rush out and get an ice cream machine! Coconut is not my favourite flavour, but I am happy to report it’s not too, too coconutty…it’s just right!

    Reply
    • Katy

      Oh yum, that sounds so good! Thanks for sharing, Carolyn! I will have to make this this summer.

      Reply
  14. Krystina

    So I made the milk today and well I come home from work and all of the fat is pretty rock solid on the top. Do I take it out and use it for something else? or how do I incorporate it back into the milk? I’m sorry if this seems to be a silly question but I don’t do things like this very often.

    Reply
  15. lori

    I have a huge coconut palm ib my front yard that’s dropping coconuts now so I thought making flour would be nice.
    I found a recipe online for coconut milk where you blend the meat with the coconut water instead of regular water. It then suggests drying the pulp/shreds for use as coconut flake. Thinking I’ll use it then for coconut flour. Anyway thought I’d mention it as an option if anyone’s usibg fresh coconut. Might be better using the water from inside.
    I’ll update after I do, to let you know. :-)

    Reply
  16. Amanda

    Actually, if you buy your coconut in bulk it can save you a great deal of money. I did the math and I can make 1 recipe of the milk and flour for only $0.94 total! :)

    Coconut here works out to be $2.75 / lb after shipping. (it takes a little more than 1/4 lb. to make 1 recipe). Me and a few of my friends will likely go in together on this order since 25 lbs. will yield SO much coconut since it’s pretty light…

    http://www.nutsite.com/coconut-unsweetened-shredded.html

    Reply
  17. Amanda

    Oh and flour sack towels (found at Target for just $3.99 for a pack of 4) make WONDERFUL straining cloths for all kinds of food. :)

    Reply
    • Katy

      This is so awesome – thanks so much for sharing your tips on going in together to buy it in bulk and the flour sack towels. That’s so great!

      Reply
  18. Amanda

    I just finished making the milk (soaked in filtered water for 4 hours). OH. MY. WOW!!!! It is absolutely delicious!!!! Truly SO much better than the store bought stuff (and cheaper too!) Thank you so much for sharing your knowledge! My pulp is in the oven so I can make the flour too. :)

    Reply
    • Katy

      Yayyyyy!! So glad you like it! Thanks so much for the sweet comment, I’m glad you know how easy and delicious it is to make your own now :)

      Reply
  19. Magda

    I Just made the coconut milk and the coconut bits are in the oven….how long will the milk last?

    Reply
    • Katy

      About a week..4-6 days usually. You’ll need to shake it up every once in a while if it separates.

      Reply
  20. Caryann

    For those who do not have any cheesecloth on hand or do not want to press their coconut milk through a chemically laden pair of pantyhose or towels, you can also use a very fine mesh strainer. Pour the coconut from your food processor into the strainer, let the liquids for coconut milk drain out into a bowl; then press out as much liquid as you can with a flat spatula. Use the leftover solids to make coconut flour.

    Reply
    • Deb heesen

      I do mine in a metal mesh strainer with an unbleached coffee filter in it

      Reply
  21. Meredith Peirick

    I have been making coconut milk with organic coconut shredds. I blend it in vitamix ans strain in my nut bag. Im disappointed because it has a soapy aftertaste. The cream part taste real soapy. My silk coconut milk didnt taste like soap. Any advice anyone?

    Reply
    • Katy

      Hmmm…I’m not sure why! Mine doesn’t have a soapy aftertaste (not in my opinion, at least). Are you sure it’s raw and not sweetened or roasted? And when you say “the cream part” do ou mean the thick layer that rises to the top? Make sure you shake it up to blend that in; that might make it taste a little better. Also, when you say your “silk coconut milk” do you mean the brand Silk (soy milk)? That’s a totally different product with different ingredients so they shouldn’t taste the same. Good luck! Hope you can tweak it to your liking! :)

      Reply
  22. Janet Paula

    I was wondering whether the dried out coconut pulk should be taken a step further and ground up finer in a blender or food processor in order to get a really thin flour like consistency.
    Thanks.

    Reply
    • Katy

      Hey Janet! Thanks so much for the comment – I updated the post so there’s no confusion. Yes, definitely grind it in the food processor after baking to make it a finer flour-like consistency. :)

      Reply
  23. Guin

    How much can you get per coconut? Is it better or more nutritious to use a dehydrator?

    Reply
  24. Guin

    Also, can you put the ground fresh coconut through a juicer and then strain the remainder? Thought it might remove a lot of the pulp. Are green coconuts better to use. Thanks for all your patience.

    Reply
  25. Pavla

    Oh my, going through your recipes my mouth just waters, I’ll have to make so many of them, really glad I found your blog!!!
    I’m about to make some raw pizza and recipe I’m using needs coconut flour for the base. Since the one in shop is not likely to be raw, I’m gonna make my own. Just have a question to check with you.. 170 degrees for drying the milked coconut, is it F or C? I suppose if id do it in dehydrator on low to keep it raw it will take much longer..
    Thanks a lot, best wishes for you. love xxx

    Reply
    • Katy

      Hey Pavla! Thank you so much for the sweet comment. Yes, 170 degrees F. If you use a dehydrator, you would follow standard instructions (I don’t have one so I don’t know exactly at what temp or for how long). I’m very curious to know this raw pizza dough recipe you’re trying – if you have success with it, do you mind emailing me the recipe? Sounds wonderful, I’d love to try it myself! :)

      Reply
  26. Pavla

    Actually one more question, how much flour that yields? Can I make it with more coconut for the same amount of water to have more flour [and probably cream instead of milk?]

    Reply
    • Katy

      It yields about 2 cups flour – and YES you can absolutely adjust proportions for a more creamy milk and more flour by using less water (proportionally).

      Reply
  27. Nadia

    THANK YOU so much for this post. I live on an island and have coconuts all over our property! (Though, in all honesty, it is easier to go down to the fruit stand and the man there will shred a coconut for me for $1…husking and getting all the meat out of a coconut usually leaves me with blisters on my hands). After I make the coconut milk I’ve been hoping there was something I could do with the left over dregs. I didn’t realize that was how you make the coconut flour. This is so awesome! Thank you thank you thank you!

    Reply
    • Katy

      Oh yay! I’m so glad you liked the post, Nadia. What island do you live on? Sounds incredible! :)

      Reply
  28. Nadia

    We live on Saipan. It’s part of the Northern Marianas islands…one of the commonwealths of the US. It is really fun. Kind of crazy sometimes, but fun. Lots of different fruits and foods to learn about. I just found my favorite fruit at the market…it’s only in season for a few weeks each year. It’s similar to the Thai mangosteens, but they are orange on the outside instead of purple. And dragon fruit is at the market as well, which is the first time I’ve seen it.

    Thanks again for the post an your blog. You have some fun stuff on here!

    Reply
    • Katy

      Wow, I just googled Saipan (I’d never heard of it) – you are REALLY out in the middle of the ocean! So neat about those different fruits! Sounds like you’ve got lots of fun stuff out on your little Pacific island :)

      Reply
  29. PAMELA SPEARS

    other than being better for you,and the sweetness, is there any reason why you can’t use sweetened coconut flakes for this? I have a bunch of this needing to be used up and I thought I could use it in some baking and just adjust the sugar content if that makes any sense.

    Reply
    • Katy

      Hey Pamela! Yeah, of course you can use sweetened coconut. It’s just much healthier to use unsweetened and so that’s why I recommend it. Good luck!

      Reply
  30. Chelsea

    Hey, really want to try this out and wondering if you could use a dehydrator to dry out the coconut instead of the oven?
    Thanks!

    Reply
  31. Nadia

    Yep. We pretty much live on a rock in the middle of the ocean. But, it is a fun rock.

    I made my coconut milk and flour last night. Both are awesome! Thanks again! Such a simple process, but it tastes so good!

    By the way, it turns out dragon fruit is BRIGHT magenta on the inside and the texture of a kiwi. Was not expecting that. I’m going to go look around at your recipes. Do you have a favorite muffin recipe that uses coconut flour?

    Reply
  32. CoconutLover

    I have been experimenting using coconuts for the last year or so and have just recently started making my coconut milk at home. What a difference!
    I have come across many different brands of canned coconut milk and a lot of them taste burnt, old or tinny. One of them even tasted a bit like what I would imagine coconut vomit would taste like (see if I buy that brand ever again!).

    I actually broke my blender a while back and I just use my food processor to blend the water and the coconut. It works out great for me.

    Thank you for the easy to follow tutorial and the pretty pictures. If you are interested in more recipes using coconut flour, coconut milk and shredded coconut, please visit my site at http://yummycoconut.com .

    Reply
    • Katy

      Wow, what a great site you have! I will definitely be following along and seeing what awesome recipes you come up with!

      Reply
  33. Mary

    I discovered making almond milk a couple of months ago and completely prefer it for obvious reasons over commercial, though I admit I do like Boathouse. Looking forward to trying this recipe as well. Hate spending $5 for a pint of creamer!

    Reply
    • Katy

      Hey Mary! thanks so much! I haven’t heard of Boathouse, I’ll have to try it out. But yes, making your own is really cost effective and so much healthier so I’m glad you are on the bandwagon! :)

      Reply
  34. Will Estes

    Hi, I tried to make this coconut milk and flour today, and just some random feedback and questions:

    1) I found that the proportion of water to coconut flakes is too high and makes the milk much more diluted than what you normally get in a can. My reference commercial product is Natural Value Coconut Milk, since they apparently do NOT use guar gum or other emulsifiers.

    Your recipe has twice as many cups of water as coconut flakes, and I am thinking that the recipe may need to be about equal amounts of water and coconut flakes. I will experiment further.

    2) The coconut milk is forming very hard and dense clumps of coconut fat in the milk. Short of putting it into a blender again, it’s very hard to mix this up. I use a hand blender and even then there are discrete clumps of fat in the milk. Any ideas on how to keep the fat more evenly distributed?

    3) The coconut flour took forever to dry in a 175 degree oven. I had better luck with 200 degrees.

    4) Is there any kind of processor that would give me an extremely fine powder for the flour? I’m thinking something more like a fine espresso grind consistency.

    2)

    Reply
    • Katy

      Hey Will! Glad you were able to make it work for you. Here are my responses to your questions:
      1.) it’s not meant to mimic the stuff from the can, but rather the stuff in the carton next to almond milk, rice milk, soy milk, and regular milk in the grocery. That stuff is thinner( you could pour it on your cereal) and the proportions are correct. If you want thicker milk, just use less water.
      2,) I’m sorry, I don’t really have any idea what you’re talking about here…I’ve never experienced that.
      3,) yeah it’s supposed to take a few hours to dry, that’s normal. Dehydrators work at lower temps for longer times, this is as close as I could get. If you can dry it out at 200 without baking it, then great!
      4.) yes, a coffee grinder will get you a finer consistency.

      Good luck!

      Reply
  35. Will Estes

    Is there any way to send you a photo of the coconut fat that is building on top of the milk? Someone here might have an idea on how to keep the fat emulsified.

    Thanks for other answers.

    Reply
    • Katy

      Oh I think I know what you mean now. Just shake it up! That’s normal.

      Reply
  36. Mrs

    If anyone wants to remove the fat from the milk, don’t through it out! You can use this as a fat replacement in baking, dips, sauces or candy recipes. Keep in mind it will have a different flavor than other fats. Just like using the other parts of the coconut, experiment.

    Reply
  37. Aussie Girl

    Thanks! Made this the other day as recipe called for he flour to add to a green meatloaf. Delicious Flour! And mush easier than I Thought! Milk tastes great too, the top ‘cream’ part of the milk, silly but is this the coconut cream u can buy tinned? Would it freeze? Just that we use that for curries and would be good to have on hand. We have been using coconut milk in smoothies lately and going through so much of It! So much healthier and tastier than store bought :)

    Reply
    • Katy

      Hey Lauren! So glad you liked the tutorial! The thick layer that settles at the top is the cream. And it’s pretty close to what you get from the can by letting it sit in the refrigerator and scooping off the top. So yes, use it in your curries if you like, that sounds awesome! Coconut butter (I believe) is made from the meat of the coconut and is much denser. I’m pretty sure that’s right but I’m not an expert! So I would continue to buy that if you like using it :)

      Reply
  38. Aussie Girl

    Or is it coconut fat/butter that rises to the top of of the milk? Just started using coconut better for cooking too :)

    Reply
  39. Jessica

    If you buy your shredded coconut in bulk, then doing it yourself is definitely cheaper than store bought. I get mine at Whole Foods for like $1.19 a pound! Thanks for the instructions!

    Reply
  40. Yvette

    Hi, great site, I am loving reading all the comments.
    My question is, is there any down fall/advantage to letting the coconut flakes soak overnight?

    Reply
    • Katy

      No, you could do that. I haven’t tried it myself, but I bet it would work. Try it out and let me know how it goes! :)

      Reply
  41. abby

    This is probably a silly question but I am in the process of making coconut oil from a fresh coconut and I’ve separated the shreds and milk already. Can I combine the shreds with water again to get coconut milk or are they pretty much a one-time use in terms of the milk/oil? Wanted to see how much I could get out of this coconut before I move onto the flour.

    Reply
    • Katy

      Good question, but I have no idea actually. I would assume that once the oils are extracted that you can’t get milk, but you could try!

      Reply
  42. Amos

    Made the coconut milk – so far,so good. I’m excited! Now I’m making the coconut flour. I’m going to try to make muffins with it. But it’s been in the oven for over an hour! It’s almost done. I guess I should have done two sheets so I could spread it out more thinly. Thanks for the recipes, love your blog!

    Reply
    • Katy

      Aw thanks, Amos! What a sweet comment, I always love hearing when readers try this stuff out. Hope your muffins turn out!! :)

      Reply
  43. demi

    hi.,..i am not sure if anyone has mentioned it but i have stored bought shredded coconut we use for macaroons an dother candy and i was wondering if i can make flour out of it as it is or i must first use water to make milk?????and also how it works with real coconut….?can i dehydrate the chunks and make them flour or i must make them milk first then dry???thanks

    Reply
    • Katy

      It just needs to be dehydrated before making flour. so if you don’t want to make the milk first then you’ll need to get it good and dried out first. Not sure about the second part of your questions since I’ve never tried it. good luck!

      Reply
  44. Alice

    Hi there,

    Do you have (or can you make) a tutorial on how to make coconut kefir?

    Thanks

    Reply
  45. Sarah

    I just made the milk today from a whole coconut. I didn’t have time to continue on with the flour so I put the flakes in the fridge and I’m going to do that step tomorrow. I hope it turns out ok after being in the fridge! My question is regarding the taste of the milk though. I’ve never had it before and when I tasted it I was reminded of having to wash my mouth out with soap when I was a kid and said a bad word or back talked my mom. What should it taste like? It was very watery, almost like watered down skim milk. Should I have used less water?

    Reply
    • Katy

      I’ve never made it from a whole coconut before so I have no idea how much water should have added but yes, it sounds like you used too much. So sorry! You could make another batch with the coconut flakes and use what you’ve already made in place of the water to thicken it up.

      Reply
  46. Emily Bonnema

    Thanks for this awesome post I used some homemade flour for some baked goods today. I did this process exactly how it is described above and I noticed I needed quite a bit more flour for my recipes then what was called for. Do you experience this? One of the recipes (muffins) I went with my gut and added more and they were pretty good. The pancakes and brownies I made were trash. The egg/oil never really absorbed. Just wondering your thoughts! Thanks

    Reply
  47. Donna Short

    I know I am a bit behind on all of the conversation about using alternative flours. I am new to finding alternatives to wheat flour and trying to choose healthier options for me and my husband. I have a question. How long does the coconut milk keep once it’s made?

    Reply
    • Donna Short

      I’d like to know the answer to that question as well, Julia. I am on a journey to healthier eating and a healthier weight. I have been using store bought almond milk for a while to mix with half and half for my coffee. Now that I’ve made the coconut milk, I am going to give it a try. I will check calories and let you know how they compare.

      Reply
  48. krystina

    SARAH- how did your flour turn out after you had left your flakes in the fridge? I am doing the same as you and making my own oil, i have made the milk and it is currently in the fridge but i don’t have time right now to continue to make flour with my leftover flakes…also a question about the oil process, once the milk has a set layer on the top (curd) what can i do with it? Is there another use also for this or is it just to be thrown away? thanks……x

    Reply
  49. Donna Short

    I am making coconut flour for the first time today. I made the milk and tasted it. I think I am going to use in my coffee in the mornings. Does anyone have an idea of how long of a shelf life it has in the frig?

    Reply
    • Katy

      Ikea! They always have tons of those and they sell a great funnel with them too.

      Reply
  50. Donna Short

    I have yet another question…my coconut milk solidified on top of the liquid. Has anyone else had this problem and if so, what did you do about it?

    Reply
    • Tana

      That stuff is the mecca!!!! It’s coconut cream!!!! You can put it in fridge and get it more solid, then whip it up in mixer and top your coffee or other baked goods. It’s way WAY better than regular whip cream!!!!!

      Reply
  51. Nina

    Just made a batch of coconut milk. Soo yummmy. Using half cup to make filling for raw vegan keylime cheesecake with coconut cream topping. For the one who had lumps in her milk, I strain mine again using a find mesh strainer just to make it nice and pure. Some of the pulp can seep through the panty hose (waiting for my nutbag from amazon!!). If you have indigestion or acid like stomach, a few sips of this non-dairy creaminess settles it down and naturally coats. Happy healthy eating! FYI my hubby just lost 21 lbs doing the whole30 from Jan 6 to Feb. He is staying grain–free and eating a lot of “clean food”. Those needing to re-establish a healthy relationship with food should google whole30. It is an interesting read. Coming off a mostly vegetarian diet for four years was a challenge and didn’t seem right. But we stuck with it and the results are amazing. Lower cholesterol, about to come off fish oils, (we get enough from what we eat) and the inflammation in our bodies has dropped. It took a few weeks for our bodies to adjust to breaking down the meat protein, but a good probiotic (ultra garden of life) has helped tremendously. Going to eat some hot soup. It is going to be -9 tonight in Kansas City with windchills 25 below! BRRRR Blessings to all, Nina

    Reply
  52. candace

    Great Blog!! I’m addicted to homemade coconut milk (I love steaming it and adding to my chai tea with a bit of maple syrup).. Amaze!

    I’m wondering if my vitamix would work as well as a food processor to grind the flour? Anyone ever tried this?

    Thanks!!

    Reply
  53. Jóhanna

    Hi!

    I must say, my coconut meal totally browned. I literally fucked it up. It really tastes slightly burned as well.
    What do you mean by 170 degrees? Fahrenheit or Celsius? 45 minutes by 170 C° (celsius) is way to hot and long.

    Reply
    • Katy

      I think you should test your oven temp! Sometimes what you set it to isn’t what the actual temperature is.

      Reply
    • Amy

      The coconut needs to dry out at 170°F or 77°C. 170°C (338°F) is much too hot to dry the flakes and would likely burn them.

      Reply
  54. Karen Park

    Katy, I use raw coconut to make coconut milk, using the coconut water from the coconut along with some filtered water. I blend it all in the blender for a couple of minutes, until it is completely smooth and blended, then I run the entire thing through my juicer (Breville Juicer). This separates the coconut milk and the rest of the meat. My question is, do I take the meat, dry it in the oven and then grind it to make flour. It is very fine consistency already. I would appreciate any help you can give me.

    Reply
  55. mimi

    is this good to make coconut whipped cream with? im trying to find a good healthy way to make a whipped topping without getting coconut from a can

    Reply
  56. Tana

    I can not find unsweetened coconut. Can I just used sweetened coconut flakes?

    Reply
  57. Nicole

    Do you have nutritional values? I read a cup is 552 calories???? Is that accurate??

    Thanks

    Reply

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