How to Make Almond Milk AND Almond Flour – A Surprisingly Easy DIY

Make Your Own Almond Milk and Almond Flour (for cheap and easy!) - via All Sorts of Pretty

So, earlier this week after finishing off a half gallon carton of almond milk, I happened to glance at the ingredients label as I was tossing it the recycling bin.  I had Almond Breeze, the kind you can find in any grocery store and this is what I found:

Ingredients: almondmilk (filtered water, almonds), calcium carbonate, tapioca starch, sea salt, potassium citrate, carrageenan, sunflower lecithin, natural flavor, vitamin a palmitate, vitamin d2 and d-alpha-tocopherol (natural vitamin e).  source

Now, I don’t know what any of that crap is except for almonds, water and sea salt (by the way, what the HECK is “natural flavor”??) so I decided right then and there to make my own.  I had some almonds in my pantry so I just got to soaking them right away.  I had heard of making your own before, but for some reason it intimidated me, like it would be hard to do or something.  I couldn’t have been more wrong.  And I posted a picture on Instagram and a lot of you were interested so I thought I would walk you through exactly how easy it is.

A little side note: I’m not against dairy or dairy-free, but I do try to limit it in my diet for personal health preferences.  I don’t need regular cow’s milk to get protein or calcium since I get it from other sources and I like that almond milk has fewer calories, is naturally low in fat and I don’t have to worry about hormones or antibiotics or about where the almond was raised, like with cow’s milk.

ALmond Milk DIY 2

Not pictured here is a 1/2 teaspoon of salt, which you should add since it breaks down the phytic acid and enzyme inhibitors and cultures beneficial enzymes in the almonds.  I don’t really know what that means, but a trusted source says to do it, so I figure it can’t hurt.

ALmond Milk DIY 3

If it didn’t take so long to soak the almonds, you could call this a 5 minute ordeal when all is said and done.  It’s just a matter of putting your soaked almonds in a blender with water, letting it blend for a minute or two and then straining – either with cheese cloth or a nut milk bag.  I bought mine here and bonus: it came with a hand written note thanking me for my order.  Here’s proof.

Make Your Own Almond Milk and Almond Flour (for cheap and easy!) - via All Sorts of Pretty

Also, one perk of making your own almond milk is that you can put it in adorable glass jars that maybe you’ve bought (one too many of…) and not known what to do with.  Not like I would know.  And this is better for the environment too so you can say you’re GOING GREEN!  Mason jars work too.

Here’s the full recipe and how to, although it’s almost laughable at how easy it is that you won’t need a recipe after you make it one time.

Ingredients & Equipment

  • 1 cup raw almonds
  • 8-10 cups of water
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • nut milk bag or cheesecloth
  • blender
  • Optional: natural sweeteners like stevia, dates, honey, maple syrup, vanilla.

Instructions

  • Soak almonds in 2-3 cups of water and salt for at least 12 hours.
  • Give the almonds a good rinse and toss in a blender with 8 cups of water, or however much your blender will hold.  You may need to do a couple of batches if you don’t have a big enough blender, but that’s okay.
  • Let the blender run on high for a  minute or two, until you can see it’s creamy and mixed well (the almonds should be teeny tiny little bits)
  • Grab your cheese cloth or nut milk bag and pour your almond mixture through it.  Squeeze thoroughly until no moisture comes through, but for the love of god DO NOT THROW AWAY THE ALMOND PULP!!!  Because you can make almond flour with it, which is super expensive, is gluten free, is a tremendous alternative to wheat flours, is very nutritious and a great way to use up every last bit of those healthy almonds.  Don’t throw it away.  Just throw it in the fridge until you get the time to dry it out (I’ll explain that further below).
  • If sweetening your milk, put it back in the blender (rinse it first) and add whatever natural sweetener you like.  For me, I like to keep the whole batch plain and just sweeten a glass as I go if I feel like having it sweet.

Yields: about 2 quarts of milk

A few tips and tricks:

Your milk will separate after a little while in the fridge.  This is totally normal, just give it a good shake.

Your almond milk will last about 5-7 days in the fridge.

To make coffee creamer, just use less water (maybe half) and add whatever sweeteners and spices you want.  I’m thinking next fall I’ll make some with pumpkin spice, vanilla and stevia.  Yum!  I bet you

Someone asked me if this saves money and after really looking in to it, I can say that YES it definitely can if you make sure to use the almond pulp by making flour with it – then you save lots because that stuff is like $10/lb.  Otherwise, you are probably paying about the same (maybe a little more), but you’re also cutting out any unnecessary additives, processing and preservatives for a much healthier alternative – how long do you think it took that almond milk to get from the factory to your refrigerator?  I’m not some crazy DIY almond milk activist that is judging anyone if you don’t make your own – people are busy, especially moms so I get it.  But if you want to make your own, know that it is easy and worthwhile.

How to Make Almond Flour (also called almond meal)

Make Your Own Almond Milk and Almond Flour (for cheap and easy!) - via All Sorts of Pretty

ALmond Milk DIY 5

When you strain all the liquid out with your cheese cloth, you’ll have the pulp left over, pictured above.  This has lots of nutrition left and can be made in to flour that you can use in baked goods to make healthier, clean versions of your favorite foods.  Or make french macarons (and then send them to me).

ALmond Milk DIY 6Again, this is super easy, but just takes a little bit of time.  If you don’t have time right then to make the flour, just put it in an airtight container in the fridge for a few days or even freeze it if you know it will be a while before you can dry it out.  Or send it to me because I won’t let it go to waste. Either way, it would be sad to throw it out so don’t.

Make Your Own Almond Milk and Almond Flour (for cheap and easy!) - via All Sorts of Pretty

Instructions

  • Spread the almond mixture out on a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper and place in the oven at the lowest setting (for me, it was 170 degrees) for a few hours.  You can leave the oven door open just a crack to release any moisture and help it dry out faster.  Mine was done after 3 hours.
  • Once it’s dry, let it cool and pop it in a food processor or blender to get a finer texture.  

So that’s it!  Nothing complicated or sophisticated about it, just takes waiting for the almonds to soak and then bake.  I put my almond meal in the oven in the morning, then went to the gym and ran a few errands and by the time I was home it was ready (my husband was home, just in case something happened).

So are you going to make your own almond milk and flour too?  I hope so!  If you have any questions, let me know in the comments and I’ll do my best to answer!

282 Responses to “How to Make Almond Milk AND Almond Flour – A Surprisingly Easy DIY”

      • cindy

        Thank you sooo much, this was such an easy recipe to follow. I love making my own fresh almond milk and flour !! I dont think I will ever buy almond milk from the store again. The only chnage I made is that I added a little less water for a 2nd batch so that I could use it as creamer for my coffee. Thank you again and please keep adding more great recipes

        Reply
      • Katy

        One cup of almonds makes about 1 cup of flour, maybe slightly less.

        Reply
    • Rachel

      Thank you so much for this recipe! My sister and I have only just joined the paleo community but we have almonds soaking! We are having so much fun experimenting with paleo recipes! I’m 17 and my sister is 9 and she is really getting into it! No persuading needed, she got stuck into it straight away!

      Reply
    • Jennier

      I don’t have parchment paper on hand.. Can I do it without?

      Thank you!
      Jen

      Reply
      • Katy

        Yeah it course! Just makes it a touch easier to transfer to your storage container.

        Reply
        • Jennier

          Thank YOU! Also, how long can it be sotred in the fridge till you are ready to put in oven? I have 3 different batches from different dates, would it be ok to combine all three? Thanks in advance!

          Jen

          Reply
          • Katy

            I think the longest I’ve held on to a batch before drying it in the oven was a week or two. As long as nothing smells funky, I’d say you’re safe to proceed. And I don’t think you should have any problems mixing different batches, but just don’t crowd the pan too much or the moisture will have a hard time escaping.

          • Jennier

            OK great, thank you! One last questoin! When do you know it’s completly dried out? should it feel like bread crumbs? Thanks in advance. Greatly appreciate your quick responses!

            Jen~

    • Katy

      Oh yay, I hope you do! It really is so easy, you’ll wonder why you didn’t do it sooner :)

      Reply
  1. Angi

    My daughter & I have Celiac disease and I’ve wanted to try both the almond milk and the flour but felt it was both expensive and full of preservatives. Also, I was intimidated to try the DIY. Thanks for the easy to follow directions and the inspiration! By the way, the photos are beautiful. Great job!

    Reply
    • Katy

      Go for it! It really is so simple, you won’t believe it. Now I just start soaking my almonds when I’m about halfway through a batch, that way I’m never without. Good luck! :) (and thanks for the compliment on the photos – xoxo!)

      Reply
  2. Kelsey @ Pinegate Road

    I think you’re my food soul mate. I’ve been making my own almond milk and almond flour like this for a while now, but I never thought to make CREAMER! You pretty much just blew my mind. This is another one of those post-trying-your-recipe comments to tell you how wonderful my coffee tastes right now with the honey cinnamon almond milk creamer I just made :)

    Reply
    • Katy

      Oh Yay! I’m so glad, Kelsey! Isn’t it the most amazing feeling to stick it to the man and make your own instead of buying something you can’t live without? That’s how I feel about making my own almond milk/flour/creamer :)

      Reply
  3. Henry Talbott

    I s it possible to get the recipes for almond milk and almond flour emailed to me? Also where do you buy raw almonds? all the almonds I can find have been roasted. Thanks! GBY!

    Reply
    • Katy

      Hi Henry! Sure, I’ll email a copy of the post right over. Raw almonds can be bought at most grocery stores – Blue Diamond sells raw, also check out the produce and health food sections as sometimes they hide the good stuff there. Also, I’ve ordered from amazon before but if you have a membership to Sams Club or Costco I’ve heard you can get a much cheaper price, though they probably won’t be organic.

      Reply
      • Gloria

        This is a great recipe! Could you email the recipe to me too please? I can’t wait to make my own almond milk. Thanks.

        Reply
  4. Pat

    I will be trying this tomorrow. Can’t wait to try this, I have to bags of raw almonds and didn’t know what else I could do with them. Thanks for the recipes!!!!

    Reply
    • Katy

      Hey Pat, thanks for the comment! I’m so glad you’ll be able to put those almond to good use. Also – the milk freezes well if you make a big batch and won’t be able to drink all of it within a week or so.

      Reply
  5. Carry

    If you have any ethnic grocery sites near you, I purchase about four pounds of almonds for $12 at an Indian-Pakistani store near me. :)

    Reply
    • Katy

      Hi Peggy! I have made ice cream with almond milk before, but it wasn’t very successful. BUT I am not giving up, I think I just need to tweek a few things. Definitely will be experimenting when the weather gets warmer and blog about my findings.

      Reply
      • Mercy

        coconut milk is great for ice-cream.
        great fudgesicle recipe is as easy as coconut milk, coco powder, ripe banana, a touch of raw honey, or other sweetener, and a small pinch of salt – and presto- awesome fudgesicles.
        for soft-scoop ice-cream add more banana and freeze.

        Reply
        • Katy

          Oh yum!! that sounds amazing! Thanks so much for sharing, Mercy! :)

          Reply
  6. Randy

    Hi Peggy:

    Just a quick question or two…Why would you want to rinse the almonds, after soaking them. Seems to me you may be rinsing away some of the nutrients, so why not add that to the other up to 7 cups of water for more bang for your almonds? Also, I tried this last night, but ground the almonds first, by mistake. It still made about 1/2 gallon and still tasted great. I then re-read the directions, to try it the way you said. That is still in the process…Thanks

    Reply
    • Katy

      Hey Randy! You’ll notice the water is pretty gnarly after the almonds have been soaking for a while, and there’s not much nutrition in it. The nutrition is mainly still in the almond itself. The water also has salt in it (remember, the salt helps break down some of the phytic acid,etc etc) so you don’t want that salt to end up in your milk – it’s just to help the almonds in the pre-process. So, I would definitely recommend to give them a good rinse and add new water – don’t worry, you’re still getting plenty of wonderful nutrition!

      Reply
  7. Randy

    Sorry, that last question was for Katy, not Peggy, but what the hey?..

    Reply
  8. Chrystal

    OMG!!!! Thank you so much! The almond flour is so expensive. My husband was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes a year ago, and he loves snicker doodles. With regular flour, he cannot have them because of the carbs, but with the almond flour, he can because they are only about 4 grams of carbs, so he can indulge a little. This is amazing, and I cannot tell you how thankful I am that you posted this!!!! Thank u

    Reply
    • Katy

      Aw, Chrystal I am so happy you found the post then :) You just made my day with your sweet comment. I have so much almond flour in my kitchen now because I find I use up the milk more than I use up the flour so it’s great. And I have had so much success using it in place of other flours, or mixing it with other flours (I like a 50/50 blend of almond and oat flour) for a healthier alternative.

      Reply
  9. karen

    If you are making vanilla-flavored almond milk, DO NOT use vanilla extract, which can be over 1/3 alcohol. Tried it once using liquid vanilla and the next day upon opening the milk jar, all you got was the overwhelming odor of the alcohol. Use powdered vanilla instead.

    Reply
    • Katy

      Interesting – thanks for the head’s up, though I have used vanilla extract before and I didn’t notice the odor of the alcohol. You could also just use the vanilla bean paste that comes from the inside of the vanilla bean. Just scrape some off, put in the milk and blend in the blender.

      Reply
  10. Melanie

    Anyone have ideas on how to make chocolate almond milk? I know that I bought someone’s version of milk chocolate almond milk a while back and it was a big hit at our house but the dark chocolate version seems to fall short. Open for any suggestions or ideas.

    Thanks for all the almond flour too!

    Reply
  11. Melanie

    Ok, so here’s what we tried. 4 tps of unsweetened cocoa powder and 5 tps of sugar to 2 cups of milk. I say we but I really mean my husband who has the LARGEST SWEET TOOTH EVER! I have to admit I didn’t try it since I think milk from anything is only for cooking not for drinking, but nutritionally speaking I think honey would have been better…..but he’s a slow convert.

    (I have more almonds soaking btw, and my flour is fresh out of the oven!!)

    Reply
  12. Rebecca

    This month I got myself a Vitamix (FINALLY) so I can make good almond milk. I’ve yet to strain it, just used in cooking and smoothies. Have you ever used a flour sack towel to strain? I keep reading the many people who blow through nutbags (literally) and they are expensive. Also when you process the nutmeal pulp into almond flour is it difficult to get it super fine consistency? Most of the recipes I have require super fine almond flour. Im glad to find this because my husband was wanting a dairy/soy alternative for his coffee. Presto I found your post here! Also do you bake at low temp for such a long time to preserve the freshness or so they don’t burn? I’ve heard of higher temps 300 degrees for 2 hours but I think that sounds to high. Just wondering. I’m new at all this.

    Reply
    • Katy

      Hey Rebecca! So excited for you that you got a new Vitamix (and totally jealous!). I’ve never used a flour sack towel before – I’ve used my nut milk bag a ton and have had no problems with it. I seriously love it and it was only $8. If it gets a hole, I have no problem buying a new one since I know how well it holds up (I link to the place I bought mine in the post). You could certainly try a flour sack towel though! Yes, it is difficult to get a super fine consistency with the almond flour…but it still works great. In fact I used some tonight for a healthy cake recipe and it worked just fine – the graininess bakes out. And I have read to bake it slow and long at low temps to sufficiently dry it out, rather than bake it. Hope this helps!

      Reply
    • Anne

      I use a knee high panty hose sock to strain the milk. It’s stretchy, so I can get it over top of a 4 cup measuring cup. It’s very fine, so the meal does not express into the milk like it does with cheesecloth, and it’s easy to clean so you can reuse over and over. Also cheap. The shape of the hose is very good also as all the meal collects down at the bottom and to get the meal out for drying you just turn the sock inside out. Much less messy than all the other alternatives.

      Reply
      • Katy

        That’s great, Anne! I would definitely recommend investing in a nut milk bag if you make the milk a lot though. There are chemicals in the panty hose that you may bot want to ingest on a regular basis. Just a head’s up! :)

        Reply
  13. ngyoung

    thanks for the recipe. i just couldn’t bring myself to buy a $10 bag of flour. i made almond butter blending almonds and wondered how to get it to flour instead of a paste. dont really like almond milk but my wife may go for coffee creamer to get the double use out of a bag of almonds.

    Reply
    • Katy

      Smart! I haven’t made almond butter, but that’s next on my list since that too is so expensive. Thanks!

      Reply
      • Tabitha

        Almond butter is easy, too. I have best luck once the almonds are lightly toasted. You can do it in your blender (Vitamix or BlendTec…), but I usually use the food processor since it’s easier to clean.

        So excited about this post and the coconut milk+flour post. These will help our budget. We can get raw milk here, but are gluten free so I can at least cut back by a gallon and get flour. This is awesome. Thanks.

        Reply
        • Katy

          Awesome! Thanks for the head’s up on the almond butter too – I was JUST thinking today that I need to make my own since I’m spending so much money buying it – but wasn’t sure how hard it will be. I will definitely give it a shot and post about it. Thanks Tabitha! :)

          Reply
  14. Katie

    Thanks so much for this awesome tutorial! I have made two batches this week and they have turned out perfectly. I just made the almond flour with the leftover grounds this morning. I live near a Sam’s club, so while not organic, I can get a hug bag of almonds for like $10.

    This past week I have just started having a jar full of soaking almonds in the fridge at all times. Then, when I want to make almond milk I can right away, or I add the soaked almonds to smoothies or whatever else! It’s worked great.

    Thanks again!

    Reply
    • Katy

      So glad this worked so well for you, Katie! I love to hear that :)

      Reply
  15. Goldie

    I’m excited to try this. How much much almond mill did the 1 cup of raw almonds yield?

    Reply
    • Katy

      Hey Goldie! Thanks for the comment – it’s a good question that I don’t know the exact answer to! Usually I do 2 cups at a time and get just under 2 cups of almond flour. So you only lose a little bit in the process. Hope this helps! :)

      Reply
  16. Isabella

    And if you don’t want to make almond flour from the pulp, you can use the pulp as “cereal” for breakfast: add whatever fruit – fresh or dried – and flavour you like – nutmeg, cinnamon, ginger, etc – for a gluten-free, grain-free, dairy-free treat.

    Reply
    • Katy

      What a fantastic idea, Isabella! I hadn’t thought of that, but I love the idea! I might try that with my next batch. Thanks for the head’s up!

      Reply
  17. Jessica

    Hi Katy!

    I loved your post. I love almond milk and have found that Blue Diamond is the brand that has the least amount of ingredients, but I would love to try and make my own. I have also been wanting to make almond flour as well, so win win. I was wondering though if you thought a juicer would work after having blended it in order to get the pulp out instead of the nut milk bag?

    Reply
    • Katy

      Hey Jessica! Good question! I don’t own a juicer and have never used one so I don’t actually know the answer. I suspect though that the pulp would still have quite a bit of moisture in it going through a juicer and that you would need to squeeze it out anyway. The pulp needs to have as little moisture as possible before drying it out. But again, I don’t know much about juicing so I’m just guessing. Give it a shot and let me know how it goes! :)

      Reply
    • Katy

      That recipe for Almond Jam Drops looks so good, Lynn! Thanks so much for sharing, I will have to try it out next time we are craving sweets. Thanks for the sweet comment, so glad you liked the post :)

      Reply
  18. Ann Aprigliano

    How much vanilla should I put in for the milk. My husband is diabetic so I buy unsweetened vanilla. Thanks, will make the coffee creamer

    Reply
    • Katy

      Hey Ann! Another reader commented that adding vanilla extract made her milk taste off after storing for a few days because vanilla extract is mostly alcohol. So, I would either add vanilla stevia to the whole batch (adds sweetness too!) or add a couple of drops of vanilla extract in each serving as you use it.

      Reply
  19. carol

    The almond milk was so delicious – and easy! Do you think I could use my dehydrator to make the flour?

    Reply
    • Katy

      Yes! Definitely! I don’t have a dehydrator so I just use the oven, but a dehydrator will work great.

      Reply
  20. carol

    Jessica,
    I soaked the almonds, rinsed, added the water and put it all through my juicer. It worked great! I actually put the pulp through the juicer twice after the initial nut juicing to get more flavor and nutrients from the batch. THEN I put the juice in my Vitamix and blended, with a little vanilla. It was sooo delicious.

    Reply
    • Katy

      Oh, I’m so glad you answered this question for the previous commenter, Carol. Thanks so much! Glad you were able to make something you love!

      Reply
    • Katy

      Hey Leona! Yes, sliced almonds should work. I haven’t tried that, but I don’t see any reason that you should have trouble. Good luck!

      Reply
  21. Vikki

    I’m not a huge fan of almond flavor. Do you think you could do the same with other nuts? Say walnuts or hazelnuts ? Hazelnut in coffee would be yummy I would think if it worked. Any ideas ?

    Reply
  22. Lisa

    Did it…worked great. And I got to finally use a Bormioli glass pitcher I bought years ago! My pulp is in the oven now. My purpose is to ultimately get the flour, to use for an almond pound cake recipe that I used to make when I did Atkins. However, I need more protein in my diet so I’m going to put the almond milk to good use, too. Thanks!

    Reply
    • Katy

      Hey Lisa! Yay, so happy you had success! Good luck on that pound cake recipe!

      Reply
  23. GB

    Do I have to drain the almonds? I just made the milk and used the same water they soaked in :s

    Reply
    • Katy

      You probably should just because that water they soak in gets pretty nasty, plus if you followed the recipe, it has salt in it. Soaking not only helps soften them, but pulls out some of the enzymes and it can make the almond milk taste a little sour. It won’t hurt you, but next time you may like the almond milk better if you rinse the almonds first and use fresh water. I’m glad you tried it though! Let me know how it works out :)

      Reply
  24. Susan

    Thank you so much for sharing, plan to buy the almonds tomorrow and get going! How much flour does the pulp yield?

    Reply
    • Katy

      Hey Susan! I’m excited for you to try it! I can’t remember exactly how much flour this recipe yields (since I usually make bigger batches) but I think around 1 or 1 1/2 cups. Good luck!

      Reply
  25. Amy

    Hello,
    I recently started making my own almond milk too and we love it! Having a hard time getting all of the almonds blended up though as I have a cheap blender. I also add a bit of honey when I make the milk so when I make the almond meal it’s sweetened as well! Also, I wanted to ask where you bought the milk jug! Thanks

    Reply
    • Katy

      What a great idea with the honey! Sounds like youre making it work for you despite the blender. I got the milk jug at IKEA! They always have it in stock and super cheap – maybe $4? It’s great for storing almond milk!

      Reply
  26. Chefjen

    I got a hand written note when I ordered my nut milk bag too! I add raw sweetened caco nibs to my cashew and almond milk with a vanilla bean…yum!

    Reply
    • Katy

      Oh yum! That sounds awesome! And I love that company – so thoughtful with the notes :)

      Reply
  27. allison1998

    I found your website through Pinterest. I just completed the last step tonight. I soaked the almonds overnight, but I forgot to add the salt. I did remember to change out the water and rinse the almonds before blending. It turned out wonderfully and smells oh so good! I had to do two batches and got about 1/2 a gallon of almond milk total. I dont have a nut bag or cheesecloth, so I just used a strainer and a silicon spatula to push the liquid through. I got good results with that, but I had to strain each batch through twice. From start to finish, it only took me about 25-30 minutes. I plan on making the almond flour tomorrow. Thanks so much for posting this.

    Reply
    • Katy

      Yay, Allison! That’s so awesome! I’m really glad it worked for you – definitely invest in a nut milk bag though so you can speed through the process. You’ll be happy you spent the $7, I promise :)

      Reply
  28. jamie

    Couple things: I make a LOT of almond milk. Recently I discovered that all almonds from California, by law, have to be pasteurized before they can be sold to consumers. They are pasteurized by either the steamed method or the chemical method. If you aren’t using organic almonds, please make sure the almonds you use have been steamed. (You can Google ‘PPO in almonds’ to find the frightening details of the chemical method.) Also, I use paint strainers (new, clean ones, of course) to drain the pulp. You can get a bag of 2 at your local hardware store for about $4. I haven’t found a better deal than that.

    Reply
    • Katy

      Interesting! Thanks so much for sharing what you’ve learned, Jamie!

      Reply
  29. Kate Manuell

    Hey! i just made my first batch of almond milk, it was so fun! Just wanted to let people know if you cannot find a nut milk bag, use a jelly strainer bag- works great! I bought mine at Ace hardware for like $5!

    Reply
    • Katy

      Ooooh, great tip! Thanks Kate! So glad you liked making your own almond milk :)

      Reply
    • Anna

      I, too, use the jelly strainer, it works great. /When I soak the almonds I don’t put them in the fridge, I leave them on the counter. / I have a NutriBullet it is small but effective, I wrote to the company to ask how I can blend without burning up the motor, they suggested I run it for 1 min, rest it for 1 min, then blend for the last min. 1 cup makes nearly 1 qt. after soaking 1 cup becomes about 1 1/2 cups, I split the blending into two batches. I flavor it with 1 Tbsp maple syrup and 1 tsp homemade vanilla extract.I’ve also read that the almond flour can’t be use by itself as there needs to be another ‘flour’ in the recipe to help hold it together. Now I’m tweaking my recipes to include almond flour. I use some of the wet almond pulp in my morning shakes. Hope this info is of help to someone.

      Reply
  30. Robbie Rose

    I am super excited to try this!!! I wonder if you added roasted cocoa beans to the water with the almonds?

    Reply
    • Katy

      MMM, interesting!! I have never thought of adding roasted cocoa beans – if you try it, will you please let me know how it goes? That is such a great idea! :)

      Reply
  31. Bronwyn

    And..once you’ve made the almond milk, you can make a “Wendy’s” frosty smoothie… 3/4 cup Almond Milk
    about 15 ice cubes
    1/2 tsp Vanilla
    1-2 Tbsp unsweetened Cocoa powder
    1/3 of a Banana
    All in the blender until smooth…enjoy!

    Reply
    • Katy

      Ooooh man that sounds so good! I will definitely be making this! Thanks SO much for the recipe! :)

      Reply
  32. Jaime

    How much almond flour does this recipe yield? Also, how can I make almond flour without making almond milk?

    Reply
  33. Antiguan

    For health reasons I have been avoiding cow’s milk. I have been blending dry nuts and making coconut milk. Recently I tried some almonds and I was amazed how lovely that came out. I was not sure what to do with the thrash, so I have it in the freezer. Thanks for your inspiration on how to use the left overs for flour.

    Reply
  34. Cassie

    I followed the recipe just as described above (only, I think my almonds were roasted) but it came out super watery. I’ve never had almond milk before, so I don’t know what to compare what I just made to. Any suggestions or input?

    Reply
    • Katy

      Ooh don’t use roasted almonds. Defeats many of the health benefits. If it was too watery for your taste, just use less water. You are in complete control of the consistency, but the almonds you used probably changed the chemistry a bit. Next time go for raw almonds and as you add water, pay attention to the thickness and stop when you feel you’ve reached the right consistency.

      Reply
  35. hanitron

    Hi Katy, thks for sharing :) i must try ur recipe & make my own almond milk, cant wait. Beautiful write-up & pics too (tumbs up)

    Reply
  36. Stephanie

    Do you think using the convection setting on the oven would dry it faster? More efficiently?

    Reply
    • Katy

      I don’t use a convection oven so I don’t have any knowledge to offer on that unfortunately. Sorry! If you do have success though, please come back and comment so others can know! Thanks!! :)

      Reply
  37. Michelle

    Once you make the almond flour, how long does it keep for? Does it have to be refrigerated?

    Reply
    • Katy

      Since the almond flour has been dried out in the oven, it can be kept in your pantry, just make sure that your pantry is cool and dry (and maybe keep it in a darker corner). I don’t actually know how long it can last because mine has never made it past a month or two.

      Reply
      • dianna

        I just made both the almond milk and the flour……so easy, I can’y believe I haven’t done it sooner!
        I didn’t have cheese cloth or a nut bag but I did have some extra chiffon cloth from a prom dress I made my daughter- I cut about a 12″x12″ square and it worked just fine to strain the almonds!!

        Reply
        • Katy

          Awesome, Dianna! So glad you liked it! If you start making your own most of the time you may want to invest in a nut milk bag though just because of the potential chemicals there might be in that fabric…plus it saves time!

          Reply
  38. Nancy

    Thank you so much! Just what I was looking for. The almond milk is great and now I know how to make the much coveted almond flour too. Thank you for blessing our lives!

    Reply
  39. Erin

    hi! Great post and photos! Can you tell us where you got the “adorable glass jars”?

    Reply
    • Katy

      The one on the left is from Ikea and the one on the right is from Hobby Lobby! :)

      Reply
  40. Teri

    I just found this post looking for steps to make almond flour for a wonderful recipe I found on banana bread that calls for it.

    Thanks for the info, can’t wait to try it out. I’ve saved my almond pulp in the freezer after making almond milk, now I can put it to good use!

    I like using truly raw/live almonds (from Spain), because California almonds, even though they are labeled as raw, are really dead due to pasteurization and have far less nutrients, as a result.

    Great article here on it: http://www.naturalnews.com/021989_almonds_raw.html

    Thanks again for the awesome instructions and pictures on making almond milk and flour!

    Reply
    • Katy

      Hey Teri! Thanks so much for passing on the info about California almonds – I had no idea! I’m glad you liked this post – good luck with the almond flour, I bet that banana bread is going to be awesome! :)

      Reply
  41. Lily

    Thank you so much, Katy! Really looking forward to making this! I’m guessing that pretty much the same method would work for any nuts? I have a coconut that I need to do something with!

    Reply
    • Katy

      Hey Lily! Yes, you can do this with any milk – I’m dying to try it with cashews, I bet it would be so creamy. I did a tutorial on coconut milk as well (here: http://allsortsofpretty.com/super-easy-diy-coconut-milk-coconut-flour/) but it uses shredded coconut since I have no idea how to crack open and use a real coconut. I hope I can learn though and then I’ll definitely post about it here. :) Thanks for stopping by!

      Reply
  42. Elaine

    I was searching for info on making almond flour and found this post. Interesting-and I can’t wait to try it IF I can. My blender began leaking so is no good now and all I have is a food processor. I have searched through the comments looking for this question, but didn’t see anything. I see that a food processor is fine for making the flour after the milk process, but can I make the almond milk in it too? Thank you and thank you for this wonderful information!

    Reply
    • Katy

      Hey Elaine! Yeah, absolutely you can make the milk in the food processor too! You’ll probably just have to make smaller batches, so that’s why I use the blender for the milk which holds the entire batch. For a food processor (which will work as well, maybe even better) just put about 1/2 or a 1/3 of the almonds and water in at a time…strain and pour in to a different container, then repeat. You’ll definitely have success with it. Good luck! :)

      Reply
  43. Elaine

    Thank you so much for the prompt answer, Katy! I bought the almonds while I was at the store, so I’m ready. I had already figured out that I might have to add the water slowly to get them to grind finely enough and was just going to try it. I think I’ll use your advice along with my idea and see how it goes. I’ll let you know and thanks again!

    Reply
    • Katy

      Sure thing, good luck! I soaked a batch last night and made the milk this morning. Whole thing takes 5-10 mins tops after soaking. You’ll love it! :)

      Reply
  44. Erin

    Thank you for this post! I bought a pound of almonds and ended up making a total of about 1 gallon of almond milk and got about 3 cups of almond flour out of it. I have never baked with almond flour before, but I see you have some recipes for that too! So glad I stumbled upon your blog a few days ago. There’s lots of neat stuff on here-and I’m looking forward to trying your iced coffee next (as it is almost 100 degrees where I live).

    Reply
    • Katy

      That is SO awesome, Erin! You just made me smile :) Thanks so much for the sweet comment and good luck with the almond flour! I bet whatever you make will be awesome. And by the way, if you can’t get through the whole gallon in about a week or so, it will freeze fine and thaw in the fridge for a few days until you’re ready.

      Reply
  45. Elaine

    One more question, Katy, before I start soaking mine. Do you soak them at room temperature (which is quite warm right now in my home) or in the refrigerator? Thank you!

    Reply
    • Katy

      I’ve always soaked them at room temperature, though I’m sure you could refrigerate them and it would be fine. Good luck! :)

      Reply
  46. Elaine

    It worked great! I’m not sure the almonds got quite as fine as in the blender-and I did find that grinding them first and then slowly pouring the water through the tube is the way to do it. The almond remains are in the oven right now drying and I’m excited to make almond flour too. My daughter buys almond milk for my 3-year-old grandson (lots of allergies) all the time, so the next thing I’m going to do is share this page with her! I’m so glad I found this and thank you for sharing it, Katy!

    Reply
    • Katy

      Oh that’s awesome, thanks so much for letting me know how it went! So glad you had success :)

      Reply
  47. trace

    thank you for this!! glad i now know how to make my own almond flour than buy the expensive ones at the store!

    Reply
    • Katy

      Doesn’t it feel awesome to make something at home so much cheaper than buying? Glad you stumbled across it! :)

      Reply
  48. Beverly

    I have had shop bought almond milk and didn’t like it at all. I made my own and absolutely love it. The recipe I used had 1desertspoon of molasses, which is high in iron, and 2 dates blended into it. These 2 ingredients give it a slight caramel flavour. Divine. As miss Bette Midler would say SIMPLY DIVINE!

    Reply
    • Katy

      Oh yum, that sounds awesome! I will have to try that, thanks for the tip, Beverly! :)

      Reply
  49. Marcela

    Recently I had to become gluten free. I do love all the almond flour recepies but it is so expensive and wanted to try making my own. I was wondering if you had a recepie strictly on how to male the flour without necessarily making the milk. Also, some recepies call for blanched almonds, that’s taking the skin off , I think, lol. Can you do that once they are soaked? Thank you do much!

    Reply
    • Katy

      Hey Marcela! I’m working on making almond flour without the milk, so definitely check back. Also, yes, you can take the skins off once they’ve been soaked and I have done this….the only problem is that it takes FOREVEEEER (like 2 hours for 2 cups of almonds) and the skin under my thumbnail hurt for a week after. Also, I didn’t really notice much difference in the milk after taking the skins off so I don’t see the value in doing it. There is probably an easier way, but I just don’t know it! :)

      Reply
  50. Anne

    Thanks Marcela, I tried this milk and it is great.Now I’m dehydrating the meal to make flour. Katy, the skins come off easy if you soak them in hot water.

    Reply
  51. Diego

    Great article! Thanks a lot and I’m definitely trying it! Btw do you have a recipe to make coconut milk and flour?

    Reply
  52. susieq

    Hiya Katy

    I have just been diagnosed with all arts of stomach problems and can no longer have any wheat or dairy. I popped on to the internet this morning looking for wheat/dairy free recipes and I came across yours….I am going to go out and stock up on almonds when I am a bit better and have the milk and flower a go so I can make the bread…thank you so much

    Rgards

    Reply
  53. Connie

    Do you know if you can dry the Almond Pulp in a dehydrater rather than heating the oven or will it get warm enough when making the flour?

    Reply
    • Katy

      Hey Connie! I believe you can, though I don’t own a dehydrator so I don’t have experience to tell you at what setting and how long for. All you’re trying to do is dry it out, remove all moisture, which is exactly what a dehydrator does…I just use the oven since that’s what I have :)

      Reply
  54. Liza

    I was wondering if you could post nutritional information for the almond flour. Is it the same as the commercially made ones?

    Reply
      • Liza

        Okay. Could I just ask, is it the same as the commercially prepared ones?

        Reply
        • Katy

          I have no idea! I don’t know what the commercially made process is so I can’t compare. But I don’t put a lot of stock in to counting calories or protein grams or fat grams, etc. I believe in eating real food that provides excellent nutrition to fuel, nourish, and help heal the body and the numbers don’t really matter. Sorry! Wish I could help.

          Reply
  55. Amber

    First time on your site. Refreshing! Great tips! Excellent photography! And can’t wait to try some of your recipes. Thanks a bunch!

    Reply
  56. Liza

    I made the almond milk, and it was so easy! Now I’m waiting for the flour to dry. My mom has a gluten sensitivity, so almond flour is a good thing for us. Plus, it’s protein-laden! And loaded with GOOD fats. Yum! I’ll tell you how the flour came out when it is done.

    Reply
  57. jan jones

    I have been wanting to try this, and I just found a 10 lb bag of raw almonds on amazon.com for only $45.90! I just hope I can use them all. I thought of going ahead and making the almond milk and flour, and freezing it. Convenient, and will help it last until I can use it all. I have just started a new eating plan that is grain free, for the most part. It is called Trim Healthy Mama, named for the book written by Serene Allison and Pearl Barrett.

    Reply
    • Katy

      Good! That’s awesome! So excited you got such a good deal! :)

      Reply
  58. Melanie

    I’ve been changing the way I shop and cook for my family. I just recently tried almond milk and loved it so much that I made a gallon with my five year old daughter. I found if I involve her she’s more likely to eat what we make. I was doing some research on what to do with the pulp and found your site! So glad I did. Thanks

    Reply
  59. Emily

    I’m curious why you would use parchment paper- is that part absolutely necessary? Can the final product be achieved with an alternative? Maybe foil or just the bare cookie sheet…. I’m pretty new to baking, so your suggestions are much appreciated. Thanks!

    Reply
    • Katy

      Hey Emily! The parchment just helps you get it in to the blender more easily once it’s baked. Not necessary, it just saves some time trying to scoop it all in there! Good luck! :)

      Reply
  60. Maria

    I just started trying to eat clean and decided to try making my own almond milk. I have been drinking the store bought kind for over a year now because I gave up dairy for health reasons. I have been doing so much research online and came across your site.Luv it!!!!!I am sooo excited to try to make flour from the pulp. I will definitely be visiting often and following you. Thank you for such great recipes and info. :)

    Reply
    • Katy

      Oh Maria, I am so happy to hear that! Thanks so much for the kind comment, you made my day! :)

      Reply
  61. Nena

    Hi Katy! Thanks a lot for this amazing post. Since then I’ve making my own almond flour and milk. Just wondering if I should storage the flour in the fridge or the pantry works ok? How long do you think it would last?

    Massive thanks again for this great idea

    Reply
    • Katy

      Hey Nena! You can store the flour in the pantry, no problem. After the dehydration process, all the moisture is taken away and the risk for growth of mold or bacteria is gone. So you can store it in the pantry, but the fridge is also fine if that’s what you feel like! :) Thanks so much for the sweet comment!

      Reply
  62. Maria

    Just had to let you know Katy that I am on my second batch of milk and flour!!! They both came out great. I used dates in the milk for that hint of sweetness and it was perfect. I am bringing this batch to my friend whose husband is gluten free to try out. Oh and I made the chia pudding too. Awesome!!! Thanks again. :)

    Reply
    • Katy

      Oh yay! That’s so awesome, thanks for letting me know! As for your other question below, you can interchange almond flour for lots of recipes, but not every one. Baking is chemistry, and a lot of recipes really depend on the gluten found in all purpose flour to get the desired result. Just experiment and see what works! Or, maybe try googling a recipe using almond flour if you’re not quite sure. Hope this helps!

      Reply
  63. Maria

    One question too Katy…can I interchange the almond flour with regular flour in recipes? Thanks.

    Reply
  64. Kira

    I just recently started making my own almond milk because I realized there was a ton of nasty crap in the store bought ones. I hav yet to make almond meal/ flour b/c I always waited too long and the almond pulp got rancid :(
    Also, I just wanted to put my two cents in there about the step of draining the soaking liquid. It is a good idea to go this b/c the water that the almonds soak in gets filled w/ all the enzyme inhibitors that were in the nuts. The whole point of soaking is too get rid of them and so adding the soaking liquid back when you blend them just sort of defeats the point! Enzyme inhibitors make it hard for your system to digest the nuts. Why would you want that in your body?

    Reply
    • Katy

      I agree completely, Kira! Plus, that water is nasty after its been soaked! Gross. Thanks for putting it much more eloquently than me :)

      Reply
  65. Ben

    I’m a little curious about the nutritional (and practical) difference between flour made from milk leftovers and flour that is simply milled almonds.

    How much nutrition and flavor is extracted in the milk-making process?

    Reply
    • Katy

      Hey Ben! I don’t know actually! Making almond flour this way is really more of a way to avoid discarding or wasting the pulp that is the byproduct of making the milk. I don’t split hairs about the nutritional value because it’s a healthier alternative to regular, all purpose flour for sure, and anything I make with it will generally be a “treat” and not a regular part of my diet. I eat almonds to get the nutritional benefit of almonds. I use almond flour to make a cleaner, healthier alternative in baking recipes. Hope this helps!

      Reply
  66. KellyLynn

    Many of the ingredients added to Blue Diamond almond milk are there to improve the product’s texture and to mimic the nutritional profile of cow’s milk. Here is a rundown of the chemical-sounding additives.
    Filtered water
    Almonds
    Calcium carbonate – Calcium supplement, often sold as an antacid. According to Wikipedia, ”
    The vast majority of calcium carbonate used in industry is extracted by mining or quarrying. Pure calcium carbonate (e.g. for food or pharmaceutical use), can be produced from a pure quarried source (usually marble).”
    Tapioca starch – a thickener made from cassava root. It is used to add a creamy texture.
    Sea salt
    Potassium citrate – an additive that provides potassium
    Carrageenan — vegetable-based gelling agent. It keeps the milk from separating and adds to the creamy texture.
    Sunflower lecithin – emusifier with omega-3 fatty acids, made from sunflower seeds. It also keeps the milk from separating.
    Natural flavor – generalized ingredient covering a range of flavoring products.
    Vitamin A palmitate – made from palm or coconut oil, this provides Vitamin A in a similar amount to the Vitamin A you would get from cow’s milk.
    Vitamin D2 – this is a plant-based varient of vitamin D, and is also used to mimic the amount of Vitamin D in cow’s milk.
    D-alphaptopherol (natural vitamin E) – this ingredient is derived from vegetable oils. The D designates it as natural (synthetic vitamin E will have a dl-prefix). This is there as a health benefit (and a marketing tool).

    Making your own nut milk is similar to baking your own bread — the product may not be as uniform as what you buy in the store, but at least you know what you’re getting. I’m not a fan of nut milks, but I love that you can make nut flour so much more cheaply. Thanks for the recipe!

    Reply
    • Katy

      Hey Kelly! I love having this discussion and I think it’s important to analyze points from both sides, so I love that you brought in your own research. I’m not going to go in to ALL the ingredients you just listed because it just proves my point of there being way too many ingredients in almond milk (all you need is almonds and water), plus a lot of what you listed are cheap, synthetic vitamins that usually aren’t properly absorbed by the body and I feel like we should be getting those vitamins from actual food or high quality supplements; not from adding chemicals to almond milk. Here are some counter points to your findings:

      1. I want to start with “Natural flavors” – You skipped right over this one but it’s VERY important. What EXACTLY is “natural flavors”? It’s not just a “generalized ingredient covering a range of flavoring products” as you put it, nor is there anything all that natural about it. The definition of natural flavor under the Code of Federal Regulations is: “the essential oil, oleoresin, essence or extractive, protein hydrolysate, distillate, or any product of roasting, heating or enzymolysis, which contains the flavoring constituents derived from a spice, fruit or fruit juice, vegetable or vegetable juice, edible yeast, herb, bark, bud, root, leaf or similar plant material, meat, seafood, poultry, eggs, dairy products, or fermentation products thereof, whose significant function in food is flavoring rather than nutritional”. So basically, it could be anything. It could be a byproduct of beef production. It could be MSG – Monosodium glutamate is TOTALLY included in this “Natural Flavor” list. Castoreum is a popular “natural flavor” in anything raspberry, strawberry, or vanilla flavored and is made from a secretion from a Beaver’s anal gland (!!!!). Beaver’s use this chemical to mark their territory. This chemical is processed and then used in a variety of products, including ice cream, candy and alcoholic drinks. Another common one is L- Cysteine. It’s a flavor enhancer made from either duck feathers or human hair. Most of the human hair variety is from Chinese women who sell it to factories to support their families. Pretty much everything derives from something on the earth, but can be bastardized in a chemistry lab, made unrecognizable as what it stared out as, and put in our food. If a company puts “Natural Floavors” in their ingredients list, it automatically raises a red flag and causes me to distrust them because they are so obviously trying to hide something that most health-conscious (or sane) people would never buy if they knew what they were actually consuming.

      2. Carrageenan
      It’s a seaweed-based additive and has been found to be extremely inflammatory and thus should be avoided. In fact, carrageenan is so caustic to the digestive tract that researchers use it to induce colitis in lab animals! The World Health Organization classifies one type of carrageenan as a “possible human carcinogen”. I know a lot of people make jokes like “Oh everything causes cancer” but I just don’t buy in to that cynical attitude and think man-made chemicals like that probably aren’t so great for us.

      3. Sunflower Lecithin – This is actually a much better alternative to soy lecithin that is in so many products, and is still likely in a lot of nondairy milks (soy lecithin has been linked to cancer, thyroid and metabolism dysfunctions, estrogen imbalance and lots of other bad stuff). That’s good that Blue Diamond is using Sunflower Lecithin instead of Soy Lecithin, however, still a highly processed ingredient that I’d rather not consume if I had my choice.

      4. Vitamin D2 – doesn’t get absorbed by the body. Like, at all. The D vitamin that we need and the kind the the sun gives us is Vitamin D3. Read more about that here: http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/84/4/694.full Bottom line: get your Vitamin D by going outside or from a high quality D3 supplement.

      So, like I said in the beginning, I LOVE having open conversations about this stuff and I’m so glad you did the research and cam up with your own findings and shared them here. Obviously, I still believe in making your own almond milk (or coconut milk, I wrote another post about that) and will always choose foods with fewer ingredients that don’t really require research to find out what those things are. Besides, those foods, especially the kind in the carton that doesn’t require refrigeration before being opened, sits on a shelf for weeks or MONTHS before it ends up in your house, and then sits for another week or two. The processing that allows “food”, most especially a “milk”, to be able to sit on a shelf for that long just can’t be good for us. In a time of emergency, shelf stable foods are a life saver and thank goodness for them. But in everyday life, I say let’s just eat real food.

      Reply
  67. Donna

    I just made the almond milk 4 days ago and have all this pulp. Thank you for sharing how to make it into a flour. I have this fabulous bread recipe for using unbleached white all-purpose flour. I want to experiment with the almond flour. Do you have any idea how to substitute one for the other?

    Reply
    • Katy

      Hey Donna! It’s a little tricky just because almond flour doesn’t have the gluten that helps most breads rise. I would google a recipe to find one that specifically uses almond flour. Best of luck!

      Reply
  68. janet adams

    I just tried putting almonds (the Costco unsalted, raw) into my vitamix, hoping to get almond flour. It is a heavier texture than the fine almond flour I purchased at the health food store. The purchased almond flour is also white, rather than the color of the almond nut flour (meal) I have made. Is it necessary to soak and dry the nuts to get the best result, or is merely grinding the nuts sufficient?

    Reply
    • Katy

      Hey Janet! Try dehydrating the almond meal you’ve made, then grinding down further in a blender, food processor, or even coffee grinder. For best results, it really needs to have all of the moisture removed. Hope this helps!

      Reply
  69. Melissa

    Wonderful post with beautiful pictures! I have been making my own ALmond milk for a few months now that I am “off” of my Blue Diamond Almond Milk. I was seriously so crazy about it if I only had 1 half gallon left in the fridge I would have my hubby stop at the store to buy 3 more so I wouldn’t run out!! SO recently the information came to me about not only the harmful effects on the intestines from the carrageenan, but the “natural flavors” that could be almost ANYTHING! SO I make it with 1 tsp of vanilla & 6 pitted Organic Dates!
    It is SOOOOO important to buy ORGANIC Almonds as you are not ingesting pesticides, BUT you are also getting Almonds that have not been IRRADIATED!! They pass the NON-Organic Almonds through a radiation system to supposedly “kill” harmful bacteria, when it just KILLS all of the available Vitamin E & A in the Almonds rendering them as good as some cardboard!
    I found a Family owned farm from California, Braga Farms that provides the tastiest, Organic Almonds! PLUS when you purchase from a small farm you are supporting a family :) and NOT a CORPORATION:( !! http://www.buyorganicnuts.com/ They also sell WONDERFUL Walnuts, which by the same method makes a great milk too!

    Reply
    • Katy

      Wow, thank you so much for sharing that, Melissa! Great tips and especially niceof you to share your source for buying good almonds. Appreciate that!

      Reply
  70. Chuck

    I found your page after making my first batch of almond milk. I was looking for something to do with the almond pulp. Your site had some good suggestions. I’m using my food dehydrator to dry the pulp for almond flour. Seems to be working well. Looking at the comments about the flour, I’m thinking of using my coffee grinder to see if it makes a finer texture flour than the blender would. I’ll let you know how it works. I use the coffee grinder to grind dry flax seeds, and it pulverizes them to a very fine consistency. Should work for the dried almond pulp.

    Reply
    • Katy

      Awesome, Chuck! Thanks so much for stopping by And yes, your coffee grinder would create a much finer flour so if you have one, go for it!

      Reply
  71. Susy

    I made it but made the mistake of not rinsing the water. The milk was gross! But, I did save the pulp.. When I dry it in the oven, it turns a bit brown, like toasted. It grinds ok but it’s not as white as the one in your picture. My question is, should I even try to use the pulp from the yucky batches? And does it usually brown a bit in the oven? I had it a the low temp you suggested :-/ it smells great!
    Some other bloggers talk about blanching the nuts. That seems like too much!

    Reply
    • Katy

      Hey Susy! Aww, sorry you didn’t have good luck your first time around. Rinsing the nuts is a must – you won’t forget next time! When drying out the flour, it shouldn’t really get toasted. I suppose if it does though, then it’s probably fine. Was your oven set to 170 F or below? Was your pan in the middle of the oven or on the bottom? Try propping the door open just bit. Good luck for your second time around, I’m sure you will love it! :)

      Reply
  72. Michael

    I just made some almond milk and stumbled onto your site trying to figure out what to do with the leftover pulp. I was hoping to make almond butter with it but haven’t found anyone recommending to do so. The recipe I made called for 4 cups of water per one cup of almonds in the blender. I’m used to drinking regular milk and the almond milk tasted pretty watered down. Is there a reason why you chose 8 cups and others use different amounts?
    Either way I’ll be using it for smoothies, so the texture isn’t such a big deal.. I was just curious.
    Thanks for the almond flour idea!

    Reply
    • Katy

      Hey Michael! You can absolutely reduce the amount of water to suit your preference. This is just what works for me. Cheers! :)

      Reply
  73. missp

    hi!! love this idea! just wondering.,..I don’t have a blender –would it be okay to use a food processor to blend the soaked almonds & water? thanks!!!

    Reply
    • Katy

      Yep! Food processor should work just fine. You’ll just have to work in smaller batches probably :) good luck!

      Reply
  74. Pam

    I am having a tough time keeping up with all of the almond pulp I’m creating. I make almond milk almost every day but cannot run my oven for hours each day. Is there any way to use the pulp in baking without drying it? It seems like you could use it and just use less liquid in whatever recipe you are making. Have you ever tried this?

    Reply
    • Katy

      Hey Pam! Every day? Maybe you should be making bigger batches less frequently? The pulp really needs to be dried out in order to be used like flour. I’ve never experimented using it in recipes while still wet. If I were you, I would invest in a dehydrator so your oven isn’t running all the time and you can leave it drying out while you go about your business. Amazon has them for $40-60.

      Reply
  75. Peter C

    I found this excellent site because I had so much almond meal leftover! I did not know that about the salt. My next batch will have the salt. I make the milk regularly now. I use a 1:4 ratio for almonds and water and it’s perfect for me. I am now off to see how to make Nutella without the nasty stuff!

    Reply
  76. fernando

    Hi Katy,

    I am making my almond milk for awhile and as you said its very easy.I don’t have a dehydrator or oven and it sadden me to throw the pulp away. Any idea or way to dry them for a poor man?

    Reply
    • Katy

      Hummm…I don’t! I suppose you could try drying out on a baking sheet in the sun, but make sure you cover it well with cheesecloth or some other type of mesh to keep bugs out. I have no idea how long that would take though. You could also try googling “almond pulp recipes” to see how you could use it up without drying. Good luck!

      Reply
  77. Jeff

    Hi Katy- Re: dehydrating the pulp- I did exactly as you said – 170 for 3 hours, oven door slightly open. What I have now is little wet clumps with the outside edges slightly toasted! Was there anything else you did to dry it out?

    Reply
    • Katy

      Did you have big clumps while drying? I broke those down so moisture could escape easily. Make sure you do that. And I stirred it around a bit a couple of times, breaking up ant other clumps as I went. So make sure you don’t have big clumps. But also – are you sure your oven is functioning properly? I’ve never toasted my almond flour at 170 so it makes me wonder if that could have affected your outcome. Don’t throw it out, you can still keep drying it – make sure it’s clump free though! :)

      Reply
    • Anna

      When I dry my pulp I set the timer for one hour, then move it around and chop up the big bits. The outside dries faster so move the inside to the outside. Set the timer again and do that each hour. It will finally all dry. I am finding it helpful as it is very cold in this little poorly insulated house and having the oven on is also helping to keep my home warm! I then put it into the food processor to make almond meal, which can be used to coat foods for cooking. Some goes into the blender to make flour. I keep all of the product in the freezer no matter what stage it’s in.

      Reply
  78. Lisa

    I’m only on my 2nd batch of almond milk, I didn’t know about adding salt, but I need to skip that because the milk is for my 9-month-old. I wanted to ask about the storage for use as a creamer in coffee. Fresh on the 1st days its been lovely, but then on subsequent days the milk seems to split and float to the top – my recipe is more concentrated with 1 cup almonds to 3 cups water. Also I add the milk and coffee granules to the cup before pouring on hot liquid. Any ideas what’s happening? Thanks Lisa

    Reply
    • Katy

      Hey Lisa – don’t skip the salt! None of it ends up in the milk itself, the salt helps pull out the bad stuff while soaking. You rinse the almonds thoroughly after soaking so all the salt washes away. As far as separation goes, that’s normal, just shake it up to reincorporate. Hope this helps! :)

      Reply
  79. Wayne

    Those who may wonder what natural flavoring is may want to check this out. Look up castoreumon your favorite search engine… Almond milk is amazing. Just found a pizza crust recipe for the flour cannot wait to try.

    Reply
  80. natasha

    It’s amazing how silly I feel after realizing how easy it is to make such expensive and trendy things! I’ve been making my own almond milk for a while but today finally decided I should do something with the pulp – who knew I could make that expensive almond flour I’ve been eyeing in Whole Foods but didn’t dare buy. Thank you for posting this simple solution!

    Reply
  81. Brigitte

    Thank you for these super easy instructions. I recently moved to a property with about 100 almond trees. Unfortunately for a small hobby farm, it is nearly impossible to sell almonds in California with all the regulations and restrictions. We harvest them and store them and use them whole and have been interested in finding out some other ways to process almonds. Thank you so much for the inspiration and sharing your gifts of all things pretty!

    Reply
  82. Brigitte

    Thank you for the info about the almond butter…I will definately have to try it and will let you know how it goes. Love your explanations during the process of making the butter!

    Reply
  83. Dewd Ness

    did yu factor in cost per kilowatt hour used by blender, and oven when comparing to purchased almond milk/flour? i also wonder how many calories were burned while preparing…

    Reply
    • Katy

      Haha, well considering how short you’re using the blender, I would say you’re still saving money. No worries there! And calories burned unfortunately isn’t much since its so easy.

      Reply
  84. Dominique

    I LOVE that the whole post is peppered with “and send it to me”s throughout! hahaha
    ps I would have said the same thing.

    Reply
  85. Kay

    Here are 2 money saving suggestions. I buy all nuts and many other things in the bulk section of either a co-op or large grocery store. Way cheaper. When drying herbs I use the oven with just the oven light on and think it might work for drying the almond meal as well.

    Reply
  86. Sarah J.

    Have you ever roasted the almonds? I’ve seen a few other recipes that soak and then roast them at a low temp or dehydrate them first. Any thoughts on that? Thanks!

    Reply
    • Katy

      I never have! I don’t really have many thoughts on it…seems like a bit more work for not much more benefit? Raw almonds have more nutrition too, so I would leave them raw. But I have never tried it so I really can’t say! Maybe it tastes better? If you try it, let me know what you think! :)

      Reply
  87. Jennie

    I am super excited to try this! I’m especially excited to get almond flour out of it. I’m the type of paleo ester that NEEDS my baked goods and almond flour is sooooo expensive. My question is- if I put the pulp in my vitamix to make the flour- what setting? I have the variable…. So 1-10 and for how long? Couple pulsing seconds on maybe…5?

    Reply
    • Katy

      Ooooh, I don’t have a vitamix and I’m nit familiar with the settings…but I turn mine up as high as possible so go as high as you’d like. You want the almonds ground as fine as possible. Hope this helps, good luck!

      Reply
  88. Justine

    Thanks! I make almond milk all the time, but I did not know what to do with almond mush. Very happy to make the use out of it. I am putting almond mush on paper on the pan, turn 170 degrees right now.

    Reply
  89. Mary Gilkey

    Thanks for the great info. Can you email it to me or send it to me via Pinterest? I am so excited to make my own almond milk, meal and butter!

    Reply
  90. Dayris

    After making the flour, can if keep it outside or in the fridge? Thanks a lot! I just made a batch!!! So excited to make something with my own flour!!!

    Reply
  91. Justine

    Drying almond mush leftover in oven, used blender to turn it into flour. Successfully!!! I used almond flour to make pie crust like graham crust. Thanks!

    Reply
  92. Shachar

    A great post, with marvelous pictures. Just one question – Celsius or Fahrenheit?

    Reply
  93. Andrea

    Great tutorial! I tried this a couple of days ago and am hooked. :) I always have almonds on hand to make my own almond butter, so making my own almond milk and flour makes sense! Thank you! :)

    Reply
  94. Roniq

    After I bake the moisture out of the meal and grind it in my coffee grinder, I use the meal to make this. Highly addictive. I put it on everything!!!!

    Reply
  95. Stacy

    Just made this. Thank you so much for posting! I’m just starting Paleo and I can tell this is going to save a lot of money. The coconut flour one too!

    Reply
  96. Cindy

    Wow…I just got almond milk for shakes and am having a hard time with it in my coffee… just not liking the taste… must be the additives!!! Thank you for this! Will be making, by the way, where did you get those cute bottles???????

    Reply
  97. George Martini

    Came across ed your blog. I am trying a vitamax machine to see if I like it. So far works great. They give you a recipe for making almond Milk . I do not remember recipe telling me to soak the almonds. When making almond flour how long can you keep it? Can it be used in place of bleached white or whole wheat flour? Thanks for the informative blog about almond milk. Great pictures for illustration.

    Reply
  98. Jennifer Crewe

    I was given a recipe for almond mild that calls for 1 cup almonds and only 2 cups of water. Do you find that 8 to 10 cups of water makes very thin milk? My blender won’t hold that much but I guess I could stir in well, extra water at the end of the process.

    Reply
  99. Jennifer Crewe

    I
    Thank you. I will try more water and see how I like it. Would make my almonds go further.

    Reply
  100. Terry

    Can you use the almond pulp from making almond milk to make almond butter?

    Reply
    • Katy

      No, you definitely need whole almonds to make almond butter because you need all the oil and fat to make the buttery consistency. A lot of it gets pulled out when making almond milk and the pulp doesn’t have nearly enough fat in it to make butter.

      Reply
  101. New Urban Youth 40+

    I’m so happy to have found this post! In addition to being excited about making my own almond milk, I’ve just come to the realization almond powder is relatively inexpensive very I live in Europe, because it is a popular ingredient used for baking, and can be bought easily in the flour/cake ingredient isle of any local supermarket. Now I have to assemble some recipes and get started experimenting!

    Reply
  102. Jessica

    I am new to the DIY almond milk. I just hated the store bought, even the organic ones. I discovered DIY three weeks ago when I started a detox. Anyway, I had just put my almonds to soak with a little lime juice when I read your blog,searching for ways to use the nut residue. PRESTO…I got up and added some salt and I also now know what to do with the residue. THANKS

    Reply
  103. Rez

    Hi Katy! I am so glad I found your DIY post on Almond milk. Your pictures and method explanation are by far the nicest and easiest to understand with your tips along the way. Thank you so much for sharing. I made this a few days ago and I am so pleased with the outcome! So satisfying to be able to make my own milk. I have been raving about it to anyone that will listen. :) Thanks again! x

    Reply
  104. Jay

    Hi Katy!

    Your post just inspired me to make some almond milk. I had no idea that you could make almond flour from the leftover pulp. Such a smart idea! A few questions though… How long does the almond flour keep? How do you know when it’s dry? How much vanilla extract should be used to sweeten? Thanks in advance! :)

    Reply
  105. Crystal

    I purchased raw sliced almonds. Do you think they will work? My doc just put me on a gluten free diet, so your DIY recipe was a very welcome find (for both the almond milk and the flour)! Thanks for posting. My almonds are soaking now :)

    Reply
  106. sandra s

    Could you email me just the recipe on my computer…my mobile can’t handle all that…got to get off gluten. Posted by Yoli Marentis on facebook. Thank you. Sandra s.

    Reply
  107. Deborah

    Hello, what a wonderful tutorial and so many helpful comments
    and suggestions. As for the almond flour that remains; yes one
    should dry and use it, of course. This should be done with the
    understanding that, since much of the almond fats as well as most
    of the almond flavour, will have been squeezed out into the
    almond milk. After all, this is why the resulting milk is so creamy AND
    delicious! This means the resulting leftover almond flour will be
    bland and dry(no oils). To the commentator who made his own almond flou
    just by finely pulverizing the fresh almonds, and found it seemingly
    difficult to dry out? Because the almond oils still remain in these nuts,
    (because they weren’t used to make almond milk), the resulting almond
    flour can be adequately dried but may still feel tacky and clump together.
    It will be much more flavourful than the almond flour left over from
    making almond milk……will it bake up the same in recipes? I don’t know.
    I’ve thought of combining fresh almond flour with the drier, bland, almond
    flour; say 2 parts to 1 part respectively; and seeing how that works in recipes.The
    I’m looking forward to trying out all these scrumptious recipes, especially
    making the almond milk. Thank you Katy and Thanks to One & All for all
    of your ideas!

    Reply
    • Katy

      You’re so sweet, Deborah, thanks for the comment! Glad you found this post helpful :)

      Reply
    • Katy

      No, it’s okay. Bu sure to rinse them really well before blending up and next time try to remember the salt :)

      Reply
  108. Bridget

    There are so many wonderful comments I haven’t got time to read them all so my apologies if my question has already been answered but just wondering if the almond milk is suitable for freezing? I know I will need a lot more flour than milk and I don’t want to waste the milk to get the flour. Here’s hoping so :)

    Reply
  109. Marilyn

    Wow! I tried homemade milk for the first time with your recipe and I’m so pleased! The taste is awesome! It reminds me of almond paste pastries I used to love so much as a kid :)
    I used the almond pulp right away by making a batch of cookies and putting it in the dehydrator, but I certainly like your idea of making almond flour. I’ll certainly try it! I must admit that the fact that I didn’t know what to do with the pulp hold me back from making my own milk until now. I knew that if I had to cook something with the almond pulp right away each time I did some, I wouldn’t like it. Now that I see I can use the pulp later, I don’t think I’ll go back to store bought milk! Thank you so much!!!

    Reply
  110. kate

    I don’t have an oven. Can I dry out the almond meal in a skillet?

    Reply
  111. Amy

    Say someone read this recipe , and a few days later made the almond meal without first soaking the almonds, is there a way to fix this? I mean it worked ok for the cake I made, the texture was a little crunchier than normal, but still tasted good….

    Reply
    • Katy

      I don’t know! Try it and let us know how it goes. I’ve never not soaked the almonds so I don’t know how it would turn out.

      Reply
  112. LILLIAN

    Just love your site ,am doing well with my almond milk and flour
    And looking forward to making some of your recipes with both.
    However can you tell once I have the flour ground what is the shelf
    Life I am A mason jar sealer and buy my regular flour in large quantities
    And seal it in the jars,but since I discovered your site I do my almond
    Milk every 2 days for anti inflammatory purposes and am acquiring a lot
    Of flour and can not bring myself to through anything out.
    Hope you can help, and I look forward to new things on your site.
    LILLIAN

    Reply
    • Katy

      If you’re making it that often and are having such an abundance of flour, I would recommend freezing it! I just heard about this recently and would be perfect for your purposes. If keeping in jars on the shelf, I would probably keep it about a month or so, but if you freeze it, you can keep it for a very long time. You can also freeze the batches of pulp and dry it all out at once if you don’t want to have to constantly dry it out as you make the milk. Then, once it’s dry, store in your jars in the freezer. Hope this helps!

      Reply
  113. Kayla

    Do you still make it with that much water? I find 6 cups of water to 2 cups of soaked almonds makes it a nice milk consistency without being too thin. But, I always prefer a richer milk to skim so I know this is a personal thing. Have you tried baking with the flour yet? Other almond flour is made with the whole nut, so I am wondering if recipes turn out differently at all.

    Reply
  114. Dawn

    Hi there. My daughter and I have gone almost entirely natural with our eating habits. Recipes such as yours, help tremendously. We love almond milk, and it is wonderful in our watermelon smoothies, so I can not wait to try this out. Can you please send me some creamer addition ideas, as my husband and I go through creamers like crazy…..instead of regular sugars.

    Reply
  115. Addy

    Thanks for this! Just recently got into making almond milk and, probably like a lot of first-timers, got to the pile of almond meal and thought…um…what now? I had an inkling that it could just be ground up into almond flour, but wasn’t sure. So thanks for putting it all together.

    Reply
  116. Tisch

    Wow, I’ve always made my almond milk with 1 cup of almonds to 4 cups of water. Maybe I was just making coffee creamer this whole time, lol. It doesn’t always last very long because I’ve always only gotten 4 cups of milk out of it. Next time I will try 8 cups and see how it tastes. A TIP: Instead of cheesecloth or a nut milk bag I buy a yard of Muslin cloth from the craft store and cut it up, and wash it after each use. I never have to double-strain and they hold up really well, even if you want to twist hard and wring it out like a wet rag to get out every last drop of milk, like I do :)
    Thanks for the great recipe for the almond flour, too. I was just throwing it out because I didn’t have the time to dry it in my over. Didn’t know I can store it in the fridge ;)

    Reply
  117. julie

    I have been making my own almond milk from Clean Gut book. their recipe shows 1 cup almonds (soaked for 3 hours) then drain and add 3 cups purified water and blend 3 minutes. Turns out GREAT, I love it but huge difference here on water measurements. I also just use a regular weave strainer and works fine. sure there is some almond bits but it’s good in my morning shake. I kept telling my friend “I bet I can make flour out of this pulp”..but I wasn’t sure and threw it out! no more…I will make almond flour! you can mix almond, coconut, flax seed meal to make yummy waffles. thank you so much for your post.

    Reply
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